Home Radiation Unmet needs in inoperable pancreatic cancer

Unmet needs in inoperable pancreatic cancer

0

Michael Chuong, MD, discusses the unmet need for the treatment of inoperable pancreatic cancer.

Michael Chuong, MD, radiation oncologist and medical director of proton therapy and MRI-guided therapy at the Miami Cancer Institute discusses the unmet need for the treatment of inoperable pancreatic cancer.

Radiation therapy is a mainstay of care for this patient population because it improves tumor control as opposed to chemotherapy alone. Use of this treatment for patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer has the potential to prolong overall survival and improve prognosis for these patients.

The use of MRI-guided radiation instead of the standard CT-guided technique is currently being evaluated in a prospective, single-arm study conducted by Chuong himself.

Transcription:

0:08 | Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a pretty bleak prognosis, and that hasn’t changed much over the past few years, if not decades. This is partly because the treatment tends to be effective for a while, but long-term disease control remains quite poor and unachievable for most patients. This includes in the pancreas itself, as well as other areas where tumor spread could occur.

0:35 | Radiation therapy is an integral part of care for inoperable pancreatic cancer because it improves tumor control, as opposed to chemotherapy alone. What some publications have suggested, including some from our own institution, is that if we can deliver a significantly higher radiation dose to the pancreatic tumor, it could lead to significant improvement in long-term tumor control in the pancreatic tumor itself. This strategy could potentially lead to prolonged overall patient survival, which represents the first major advance and the first prognosis for these patients for several years.